It’s been years since I’ve popped in to Top Gear Stockport/TGS Tuning & Fabrication (six years in fact, judging by this blog post I wrote back in 2011), which is a shame considering how local they are and the quality of work that they put out.

TGS Dyno Night

Late last week, I got word that the guys were holding an all-day dyno event at their premises. Since importing my C33 Laurel, I’ve had no idea as to what sort of power it was running, although the turbo, injector and MAF setup hinted that up to and around 300bhp should be expected. Seeing as it was relatively cheap to get the car on the dyno for a couple of power runs, I thought it’d be worth a shot.

TGS Dyno Night

I’ve never been to a dyno event before; I guess they’re not really the sort of thing you tend to see drift car owners at, so I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect. First things first though, the TGS guys got underneath to make sure the Laurel would even be able to ascend the ramp and dyno.

TGS Dyno Day

A few subframe and exhaust measurements later and, after the removal of the side skirts and rear bumper, we were on. After straps were tightened and sensors mounted, the guys wasted no time in getting things underway.

TGS Dyno Day

As TGS bossman Craig started the first power run, two things became apparent. The first was that my fears regarding the unknown “chip” on my ECU and its indeterminable redline (coupled with massively inaccurate rev counter) really began to grow as the revs carried on coming. The second was that my drivers side rear wheel was way more bent than I had thought it was, with the damage having been caused by a handful of incidents (one involving a curb, the other involving me missing third gear at Driftland, causing an extremely close Alex Law to bash wheels with me). The TGS guys told me that this wheel wobble would probably account for a not-inconsiderable loss in power being read by the dyno.

TGS Dyno Day

Three nerve-wracking power runs later and we had a figure. If anything, I was more pleased that the car was running right without any over fuelling, misfires and boost leaks, and that it actually survived the runs in the first place.

TGS Dyno Day

Ignore the rev reading along the bottom of the diagram by the way, we’ve no idea what revs the car was actually pulling.

Nathan had also chosen to come and see how much power his CA18-equipped S13 was putting out. Once again, you could sense the tension as everybody braced themselves for the possibility of exploding Nissan engine parts being ejected.

TGS Dyno Day

We needn’t have worried. Despite a small misfire, Nathan’s S13 powered through and clocked a fantastic 290bhp. Not bad at all for a CA with a T28 turbo and bolt-on modifications!

TGS Dyno Day

It was great to know that our cars were running right and, if anything, the night served as a big reminder that I needed some less bent rear wheels. As chance would have it, I picked up another set of URAS NS-01s the other week, so I’ll be able to use them shortly once they’ve been painted up.

TGS Dyno Day

Thanks to Craig and the rest of the guys at TGS for all of their help on this particular night.

 

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